Electronic Media Law

Electronic Media Law

Number of page: 447
Author: Roger L. Sadler
Publisher: SAGE
Rating:
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

′′···BRAND-NEW for FALL ′05: Visit www.wiu.edu/users/mfrls for the latest updates in court cases, laws and regulations since March 2005!!!Even though the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution grants freedom of speech and freedom of the press, laws and regulations governing media frequently evolve as the media themselves do. As a result, it is often a challenge to keep pace with new laws and regulations.Electronic Media Law is a comprehensive, up-to-date textbook on the constantly changing and often complex world of electronic media law. Author Roger L. Sadler examines the laws, regulations, and court rulings affecting broadcasting, cable, satellite, and cyberspace. The book also looks at cases from the print media and general First Amendment law, because they often contain important concepts that are relevant to the electronic media. Electronic Media Law is written for mass media students, not for future lawyers, so the text is straightforward and explains ′legalese.′ The author covers First Amendment law, political broadcasting rules, broadcast content regulations, FCC rules for station operations, cable regulation, media ownership rules, media liability lawsuits, intrusive newsgathering methods, media restrictions during wartime, libel, privacy, copyright, advertising law, freedom of information, cameras in the court, and privilege.Key Features′′′′Provides an easy-to-use format of chapter categories and sections that facilitate research on individual topics ′′Frequently Asked Questions highlight important points from cases ′′Explains complex, legal concepts in basic terms that give students the foundation for further studies in electronic media law ′′Electronic Media Law provides an understanding of the First Amendment and the American legal system with an emphasis on the electronic media. It is an excellent textbook for undergraduate and graduate students studying broadcast law and media law.′′